telnet

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what it is

(see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telnet)

(from http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=define%3Atelnet&btnG=Search)

# Telnet is a protocol for remote computing on the Internet. It allows a computer to act as a remote terminal on another machine, anywhere on the Internet. This means that when you telnet to a particular host and port, the remote computer (which must have a telnet server) accepts input directly from your computer (which must have a telnet client) and output for your session is directed to your screen. There are many library and information resources that are accessible through telnet. Back to Top
support.sbcglobal.net/general/662.shtml

# The standard protocol for connecting one computer to another (usually, one of these computers will be a server running Unix). Telnet allows you to connect to another computer, input commands, and run programs. When you connect to your campus email from a public terminal at the University of Washington, you are usually "telnetting" to dante or homer. From the "shell" of dante or homer you can telnet to any computer in the world, provided that you know the address, and can log on with a username and password.
catalyst.washington.edu/glossary.html

# Internet standard protocol for remote login (terminal connection) service. TELNET allows a user at one site to interact with a remote timesharing system at another site as if the user's terminal were connected directly to the remote computer. [San Diego State University]
www.ichnet.org/glossary.htm

# A terminal emulation protocol that allows you to make a terminal connection to other computers on the Internet. This requires that you run a telnet client on your computer and connect to a telnet server on the other machine.
www.utoronto.ca/ian/books/xhtml1/gloss/gloss.html

# A program that enables you to open an interactive login session over TCP/IP networks like the Internet. Commands you enter from your own computer are executed exactly as if you were seated at the remote machine. Some computers require you have an account for access, while others function as public archives where no unique login is necessary. Example: telneting to UNIX or similar computers using VT00 terminal emulation (as opposed to IBM3270 or fullscreen emulation).
www.oit.ohio-state.edu/glossary/gloss4.html

# The standard protocol for connecting one computer to another (usually, one of these computers will be a server running Unix). Telnet allows you to connect to another computer, input commands, and run programs. When you connect to your campus email from a public terminal at the University of Washington, you are usually "telnetting" to dante or homer. From the "shell" of dante or homer you can telnet to any computer in the world, provided that you know the address, and can log on with a username and password
www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~dl/fac_glossary.html

# The command and program used to login from one Internet site to another. The telnet commmand/program gets you to the "login:" prompt of another host computer.
www.library.arizona.edu/rio/glossary.htm

# Protocol that provides terminal emulation using the TCP/IP protocols. Telnet allows users to log onto and access remote computers.

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